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Thrifting

  • InLifestyle, Thrifting

    How To Fix The Brim Of A Thrifted Straw Hat & Get The Instagram Look For Less

    Ah, straw. Whether it’s made into bags or worn as hats, straw is one summer trend that isn’t going away any time soon. Thankfully, all great trends come back again, which means that you can skip the fast fashion and hit the thrift store to find yourself the trend. But when you do, it will likely not be in pristine condition. Secondhand shopping means sometimes looking at items with a little imagination. Maybe there’s a little snag in the brim of the hat or an ugly accessory wrapped around the top. There are plenty of ways to fix the brim of a thrifted straw hat with items that you already have at home. You’ll just need a little bit of time and patience to get the look that you saw on Instagram.

    My straw hat came to me by surprise. I wasn’t necessarily looking for one when I entered the thrift shop that day, but I’ve been eyeing up anything straw when I pass it by lately. I tossed it into my cart, grabbed a few other items, and went over to the fitting rooms. As soon as I put on the hat, I knew it was meant to be. There was pretty much a big golden halo and the *AHH* church sound effects going off in the background. Then I turned around and the person behind me was clearly not seeing what I saw when I looked in the mirror.

    I couldn’t blame her, to be honest. While the hat did fit on my head well, it had glue marks from something that had been ripped off of the band. It was also curled up around the outside. Your average thrifter might have tossed this to the side and tried again. But I could see the potential of the straw hat from the moment that I put it on my head. It was a no-brainer for me — especially since the price tag read $1.99 and it was half off day. SCORE.

    The next step was to take my new straw hat home and get it looking as good in real life as it did in my head. My first concern was to sanitize it. While I generally don’t mind buying hats a thrift store, I still take them home and make sure they’re as sanitized as possible before I wear them. Thankfully, this was easy, since it was a straw hat. The next concern was cleaning the glue off the band and seeing if I could get the edges of the hat to sit flat, instead of curling upward. Here’s a simple, step-by-step of everything I did to fix my thrifted straw hat.

    Clean the straw hat.

    Before I did anything, I sprayed my newly thrifted straw hat with Castile soap. I am a big fan of using this spray mixture on thrifted items. My personal recipe is very non-technical. I squirt a few squirts of Castile soap into a spray bottle and fill the rest with water. After spraying the hat and letting it sit for about ten minutes, I wipe it off with a rag. Then I spray it down again with some white vinegar, wipe it off, and it’s good to go.

    The Castile soap mixture also worked to get the glue off of the band of my hat. This was a nice little surprise to me and made my job that much easier. The Castile soap isn’t just antibacterial, but it helps visually clean off anything from the hat too.

    Iron the brim.

    I really hope that you didn’t just read the heading and not dive into this part because it’s not exactly that easy. You can’t just put the iron on the brim. That might burn the hat or make it stick to the iron. Since I didn’t want to ruin my straw hat, I was really careful.

    I turned my iron on the medium setting, set a towel over the top of my straw hat brim, and ironed it that way. Honestly, I probably could have put it on the high setting, but I didn’t want to ruin it. The straw hat went from curled brim to flat as a pancake in just minutes. It stayed that way since, too.

    It’s truly that easy, my friends. When it comes to thrifting, sometimes a little imagination and a quick DIY go a long way.

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    3 Natural Fabrics That I Always Look For At The Thrift Shop

    I have been thrifting pretty regularly for about two years now. I’ve gone through many phases during that time. There was the throw-it-all-in-the-cart phase, where I would toss in every single thing that I *might* like. There was also the spend-half-an-hour-in-the-fitting-room phase, which was the most annoying to other shoppers. Oh, and who could forget the homewares-only phase, which left me with 72 mugs and no place to put them. Now, I am on the buy-only-what-I-really-need phase, which is my personal favorite of all of them. I’ve gotten a clear focus on what my personal style is and now I’m on to the search for all natural fabrics — linen, cotton, and silk.

    Why natural fabrics, you ask? Well, to put it simply, synthetic fabrics are harmful to you and bad for the planet. That’s the short explanation. But to dig deeper, you need to know a little more about synthetic vs. natural fabrics. Natural fibers are created by animal, vegetable, or mineral sources. Synthetic fibers are man-made textiles that are made entirely of chemicals. You can probably guess from reading their definitions why one might be deemed “better” than the other.

    Of course, no fabric is completely perfect. There are ups and downs to just about everything in the fashion world, and ultimately what you wear and buy is a personal decision. Fashion, in general, is personal. What you choose to wear on your body may differ from someone else. Personally, I like to stick with natural fabrics for a few reasons; 1) They feel better on my body and 2) They create no chemical or microfibre runoff when in the laundry.

    I’ve thrifted so much that I can pretty much tell what an item is made out of when I touch it. I love to walk through the aisles and push the hangers from one side to another to feel the fabrics. While I don’t go through every single item in the store, I can easily push through the colors — mainly grays, whites, olive greens, and anything striped — and styles that I like. But I didn’t start out with having the sixth sense for fabrics. I started searching for natural fabrics by reading the labels.

    Reading labels is the number one way to learn about fabrics.

    I know, I know. Reading labels takes time. But if you’re committed to knowing what’s on your body, it’s worth it to take the time to read. Think about it this way: you wouldn’t buy a new product in the grocery store without checking the ingredients, right? The same goes for your clothing. Your skin is your biggest organ, and what you put on it matters. Your skin will absorb what sits on it. If that is chemicals, dyes, and pesticides, then that’s what you’re absorbing. That’s true no matter how many times you wash it.

    Of course, even natural fabrics have their downfalls. Like I mentioned before, fashion is personal and so is the decision of what you buy. Personally, I will always stick with natural fabrics. Here’s the low-down on my top three favorite fabrics to shop at the thrift shop, so you can make your mind up about what to buy too.

    Linen.

    natural fabrics at the thrift shop

    Before we get all technical about what linen is, let me gush about my love of the fabrics for a little bit. Now that summer’s here, I am all about that linen life. First of all, it’s breathable. I absolutely hate sweating, and there’s nothing worse than wearing a fabric that makes you even hotter in the summertime. This lightweight fabric keeps you cool at all times.

    Secondly, I really love that it wrinkles. I love fabrics that look lived in, because, let’s be honest, that’s what clothing is for. I don’t want to walk around in a fresh-pressed, stuffy outfit all day. Instead, I want people to know that I love and live in the clothing that I wear. It’s the ultimate sign of comfort.

    Now let’s get into the technical reasons to love linen. The fabric is made from flax plants, and every single part of the plant is used. It’s extremely versatile, is stronger when wet, and doesn’t absorb bacteria. Pretty much the only downside to linen, besides that it wrinkles, is that it’s pricey. This is because linen takes longer to manually produce than other fabrics. Thankfully, it’s super affordable at the thrift shop.

    Cotton.

    Nothing beats the feel of cotton. Well, except maybe organic cotton. This fabric is a staple for a reason. It wears well, is comfortable, and last a super long time. On top of being light and breathable, it’s also completely natural.

    Cotton, as you might know, is a plant. It’s completely natural, but there are plenty of downsides. Cotton is extremely water intensive. It can take up to 700 gallons of water to make a single t-shirt. The plant is also often genetically modified, which can be harmful to the plant and the farmers growing it. This is why it’s great to shop for cotton at the thrift store, instead of buying new. Let’s make the most out of the cotton that’s already out there before buying new.

    Silk.

    Ah, silk. Is there anything more satisfying than slipping on this smooth, delicate fabric? Rhetorical question. It’s expensive feel, and, well, expensive too. Unless, of course, you get it from the thrift shop. Silk is a fabric that’s been around forever. Seriously, it was first observed in 27th century BCE, when a silkworm cocoon fell into her cup of tea and began to unravel. Come on, that’s incredible.

    One of the biggest and most obvious downsides to silk is that it’s made by silkworms. That means that it’s not vegan. Unfortunately, the silkworms die once they are done making the fabric. They are also domesticated to create silk until then. At the end of the day, it’s a personal decision to buy or not buy silk.

    There are — and will always be — ups and downs to all fabrics. But, by far, the most ethical choice of them all is to shop secondhand. Using what is already made is always the best way to go. You know, besides not buying anything at all. The more you thrift, the more you will find what fabrics are your favorites. It takes time and awareness to figure out what fits your lifestyle. Do your research, read your labels, and get excited about learning about new fabrics.

    xx.

    6
  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    5 Ways To Build A Sustainable Closet That Cost Nothing

    When I first started building my sustainable closet, I didn’t actually know that I was building one. I knew that I loved to thrift and saving money was great. It just so happened that I found out about saving clothing from the landfill around the same time, which made me amp up my habit and stock my closet with only secondhand finds. It wasn’t until I downsized my closet, focused on fabrics, and decided to stock up on items that I knew would last that I decided to invest in some sustainable items. And, yes, let’s just get this out of the way now, sustainable clothing is expensive.

    Sustainably made items are priced higher for a few reasons, but that topic is for a different post. (If you’d like to dive into the price, this Live Planted podcast episode is a great start!) My point is that jumping into building a sustainable wardrobe is intimidating. It’s a huge task that can seem daunting. But there are three ways to start building your sustainable closet that are completely free. You won’t have to buy any fancy brands or throw everything out and start over. Because the truth is that building a sustainable wardrobe is all about focussing on what you already have.

    Sustainable fashion is a spectrum. There is no one way to build a sustainable closet, and not everyone does it the same. It’s important to know that before you start. There’s also not a check-list of how to be sustainable. You don’t get a new colored belt for reaching a new level or receive an award. Building a sustainable closet is a personal journey. It’s about keeping yourself accountable and staying true to your beliefs, while also helping the world and the people in it in the process.

    1. Know Your “Why”

    You will not succeed at building a sustainable closet if you don’t know why you’re doing it. That goes for just about anything in life. You need to know your reason why and you need to believe it. We all have our own reasons for going sustainable. Whether it’s to help the world, contribute to living wages around the world, or just to save money, there is no wrong or right reason. You just have to really, truly believe it.

    If you’re unsure of where to start, the documentaries The True Cost (available free on Netflix), River Blue (buy a digital download), and Sweatshop: Deadly Fashion (available on YouTube). These are great films to watch and even rewatch no matter where you are on your sustainable journey to remember why you’re on this journey.

    I find that keeping a fashion journal of brands I love, outfits that have become my favorite, and my little findings that I want to keep in mind. If you’d like to see how I do my fashion journal, I can definitely do a post about it.

    2. Stop Buying (Just For A Few Weeks)

    One of the best ways to go sustainable is to stop buying clothing for a period of time. I recommend starting with a week, or trying for two if you’re feeling ambitious. This gives you a chance to see what you’re thinking about on a daily basis. You might be surprised at how much you think about fashion. But the opposite of buying fast fashion doesn’t have to be buying from slow fashion brands. It can be simply taking a break from buying anything at all.

    I’m not saying that you should stop shopping forever. This is just a way to take a little break from buying any items and see what you think about on a daily basis. By slowing down your spending and shopping habits, you can focus on what you already own. It gives you a chance to see what your personal style is and what your closet could really benefit from when you’re ready to start buying again.

    3. Wear What You Own

    Contrary to what Instagram makes you believe, you don’t need a closet full of slow fashion brands to call yourself sustainable. You just need to get the most wear out of what you already have in your closet. It’s hard to appreciate the clothing that you have when you’re constantly adding new items to your closet. Take a step back, look at what you have, and celebrate the items that you own. Heck, you never know what you’ll find in the back of your closet.

    This is also a great way to nail down your personal style and take inventory of what you have. You bought the items in your closet for a reason. The best way to figure out your personal style is to look at what you already own and work your way from there. You can also downsize the closet that you own, donate items that you know you’re not wearing, and have a better grip of your closet if you do decide to add to it. You know, instead of just buying more hangers and shoving items in.

    4. Change The Way You Wash

    This tip is so simple that you might not even realize it’s a way to go sustainable. But by stepping back, reading labels and changing your washing habits, you can truly become more sustainable without spending any money at all.

    First of all, read your labels. Taking the extra time to look at how your items need to be washed will prevent them from shrinking, tearing, or stretching out. You won’t have to buy new items, because you’re taking care of the items that you already have.

    Wash on cold. It’s so simple and so effective. Lower temperatures protect the dyes and prevent items from shrinking. While we’re here, you can also try skipping the dryer by air-drying some of your clothing. It saves energy and helps your clothing hold up better.

    Lastly, wash your clothing in like-colors. You know, darks with darks, lights with lights, colors with colors. This helps the colors keep their hue. You won’t have to worry about your whites turning pink or getting rid of clothing because they get beat up in the wash.

    5. Borrow From A Friend

    Okay, so you stopped shopping, looked at what you own, and are still feeling the need to shop. Instead of shopping at the store, shop your friend’s closet. Borrow isn’t just sustainable, it’s really freaking fun. This is the perfect opportunity to “try on” a style that you’ve been dying to. And it comes at no cost to you or the environment.

    Let’s be honest, your friend will probably be flattered that you asked. Plus it’ll be fun to get together and explore each other’s closet. Just make sure that you’re taking care of the item(s) that you borrow and give them back in a timely manner. If you end up liking the item enough, you can start looking for it at the thrift store or invest in the item from a sustainable brand.

    There is no right or wrong way to go sustainable. This is your journey, so do what’s right for you and make your own rules. The only wrong way to go sustainable is to do nothing at all.

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    All The Places To Donate Your Unwanted Clothing — That Aren’t The Thrift Store

    It’s springtime. The flowers are blooming, the days are longer, and you’re probably eager to swap out all those sweaters in your closet for something a little more springy. In other words, it’s closet cleanout time. Whether you’re going full-Kondo or just doing some tweaks here and there, all of those unwanted items have to go somewhere. As good as you might feel about doing all of your spring cleaning, it’s important not to forget about where all of your unwanted clothing items are going after they’ve left your house.

    Cleaning out a closet can be a long, daunting task as it is. I get that. But just throwing unwanted clothing items into a bag and sending it to the thrift store just simply isn’t working anymore. Part of this, as you might already know, comes from the big boom of Kondo-ing a house. After Marie Kondo made her Netflix debut, people started donating items in extremely high quantities. (It’s the same problem that happened after the book came out, I’d like to add.) Kondo does not give practical recycling or disposal tips, which I personally see as one of the downfalls to how she approaches home cleanouts.

    Secondhand shops cannot physically handle the number of donations that they are getting. That means that some of those items will most likely go to the landfill. According to TIME, some thrift stores even had to restrict donations after the Marie Kondo show came out on Netflix. Storage is already a problem in many thrift stores, and some places even have to pay to dispose of the items that it cannot sell. That defeats the purpose of donating items.

    But even if you’re not into Kondo-ing your home, it’s nice to find new, local alternatives to where your clothing is going. Believe it or not, there are plenty of non-profits that are putting specific clothing items to good use. Yes, it takes a little bit longer to separate dress clothes from loungewear and workout gear from denim, but it really does pay off. If your main goal is to keep item out of the landfills, then the below alternatives for donating are for you.

    Workwear

    Dress For Success

    Dress For Success has 153 offices in 29 countries, so there’s likely one around you ready to take your unwanted women’s workwear off your hands. It’s a not-for-profit organization that has a goal to empower women to achieve economic independence by providing them the support, resources, and clothing that they need. You can donate your gently used professional attire, give a monetary donation, or volunteer directly. This is a great way to give your unwanted blazers, dresses, and trousers a new, meaningful purpose.

    Jails To Jobs

    This non-profit organization teams up with local community organizations to collection workplace clothing for men and women that have recently been released from jail. They take everything from blazers and blouses to suits and shoes to give to people who need a little help getting back on their feet after being incarcerated. There’s a national directory on the website for the places you can donate. Each person must sign up and qualify to receive assistance, and the organization also offers tattoo removal and job training.

    Career Gear

    Career Gear is a non-profit based in New York City and takes specifically men’s workwear. The organization gives to low-income men who need help finding a job. It also offers job and life skill training. If you’re not in the area, you can mail in your gently used casual and formal menswear. The organization also takes accessories like watches, hats, and bags as well. The only catch is that it will cost you to send them in. As an added bonus, Career Gear has a green initiative on the website as well.

    Workout Clothing

    RunningWorks

    Any gently used workout clothing or accessories can be sent to RunningWorks. It’s a non-profit that provides career development, mental health counseling, group therapy and help with housing for the homeless. To donate, email info@runningworks.org to get an address to send to.

    Patagonia

    If your workout gear is from Patagonia, the brand will take it right back when you’re done with it. You can ship the clothing to Patagonia Service Center at 8550 White Fir Street in Reno, NV (89523-8939). You can also take it to participating Patagonia stores near you. The brand will make sure that the items get recycled and stay out of the landfill.

    Shoes

    Soles4Souls

    Soles4Souls takes unwanted shoes and gives them a purpose again. The non-profit creates sustainable jobs, repairing the worn out shoes that get donated, and give them to those in need. You can donate your shoes at your local DSW or Zappos.

    Nike

    Nike will take any old tennis shoes for its’ Reuse-A-Shoe Program. The program takes old tennis shoes and turns them into high performance surfaces around the country. You can donate any brand of tennis shoe to any Nike store.

    Denim

    Blue Jeans Go Green

    Cotton Incorporated came up with this program that turns unwanted denim into insulation for Habitat For Humanity homes. The program accepts any colored denim in ay condition. You can ship them directyl to the brand, using the mailing labels on the website. Or you can take them to any Madewell, Rag & Bone or American Eagle store to get 10% off a pair of jeans while you’re there.

    Bras

    Free The Girls

    Yes, even your bras can be donated somewhere other than the thrift store. This non-profit takes used bras and give them to survivors of human trafficking to sell in their country. Women can start a safe business and earn living wages. You can donate to Free The Girls at 1552 Pioneer Trail Chesterton, IN (46304). The website also has drop-off sites throughout the country.

    Harper Wilde

    When you buy a bra from Harper Wilde, the brand will send you a return label to send back all of your used bras. The brand collects them to turn them into new bras. Of course, there’s the catch that you have to buy one first.

    These recycling steps take a little more effort than just throwing them into a bag, but it is worth it. When we can get items directly to where they can be reused, they have a better chance of staying out of the landfill. Of course, there are plenty of local places to take your clothing as well. There are always clothing banks or even just friends in the area who are us for a swap. That’s the magic of clothing.

    xx.

    4
  • InLifestyle, Thrifting

    3 Ways To Leave Your Privilege At The Thrift Shop Door

    The last time that I was at the thrift store, I saw people from all walks of life. There were mothers with small children, husbands sitting in the for-sale couches while their wives shopped, and teens running through the aisles looking for the best over-sized sweaters. There were conversations starting with, “do you think this will work?” and “OMG how cute is this!” over by the fitting rooms. Some people were looking for work attire, others for day-to-day clothing. Everyone had a reason for being at the thrift store that day, but they all had different levels of privilege.

    Everyone gets into thrifting for their own personal reason. For me, it was to save money, and then eventually that turned into trying to save clothing from the landfill. But others might be thrifting because it is their only choice. When you step through the thrift shop doors to see what you can find, you’re not alone — you’re bringing your privilege with you.

    Privilege by definition is a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group. If you thrift to find cute clothing, to save a few bucks, or basically any other reason beside you absolutely have to, you are bringing privilege with you. It’s important that we keep this in mind when running through the aisles looking for new clothing or poking a little fun at outdated items that you might find on the shelves.

    Of course, thrifting is for everyone. That’s what makes it so much fun! Anyone can walk in, save some clothing from the landfill, and find some seriously great deals. It’s just important that you realize that not everyone in the thrift shop with you is there for the same reason and be mindful of everyone’s reason as your filling up your cart.

    Thankfully, there are three super simple ways to leave your privilege at the thrift shop door. Of course, not everyone’s privilege will be the same. It’s more of a spectrum than a do-I-or-don’t-I answer and will fluctuate throughout your life. But these three ways will help you use the privilege that you have to everyone’s advantage.

    1. Remember that you don’t have to buy everything that you like.

    Just because you see a bunch of items that you like doesn’t mean that you have to buy it. It’s as simple as that. If you’re shopping with privilege, you’ll likely be able to fill up a cart and buy a handful of items that you find. That doesn’t mean that you need those items in your life though.

    The best way to combat this privilege is to think hard about why you want to bring an item home with you. Will it make your life better? Do you have a place for it? Will it get a good amount of use? Or will it be better off with someone else? Asking yourself these questions will help you decide if buying the item is meant to be or if it’s not the right match.

    2. Be mindful of other shoppers.

    By all means, get excited when you’re at the thrift store. Skip down all the aisles and get excited to be there. Just remember that there are other people shopping who might not be as excited as you. We are all on different paths to the thrift store. Some people are there because they can’t afford anything else. Others are there to resell or find a great hidden gem.

    3. Bring a bag of donations when you go to the thrift shop.

    Some people use the thrift shop as a place to dump their unwanted items. But if you’re really looking to drop the privilege, you’ll bring something with you when you come to shop more than just once or twice a year. And if you really want to make a difference, you’ll bring some items that people actually want. Not just your out-of-date sweaters or t-shirts that you’ve already worn to death.

    I heard the motto, “give what you can, take what you need” earlier this year, and it really resonated with me. It’s not about the charity aspect. It’s about keeping the thrift cycle alive and not just taking from it. Especially, if you don’t necessarily need those items.

    The thrift shop is a place to experiment with style and find incredible deals. Most importantly, it’s a place to have fun while doing it. The truth it that almost everyone is shopping with privilege. When we can drop it at the door, be mindful of why we’re there, and take only the items that we truly need, the thrift shop experiences is more enjoyable for everyone involved.

    xx.

    9
  • InThrifting

    My Thrifted Sweater Stockings Make For The Ultimate Upcycled Holiday

    I’ve always tried to find the most unique, sustainable ways to decorate my home. From thrifted shelving to secondhand throw pillows, there have been so many ways that I’ve gone eco-friendly in my home. But it was even more important to me to stick to my mindset this holiday season. Warm little touches around the home are what the holidays are made of. There’s nothing better than a handmade touch to make the season bright. So I decided to make thrifted sweater stockings for the first holiday in my home. Because that’s what the holidays are for me — handmade touches.

    It’s no secret that I thrift a little too much. Despite a successful stint at a minimalist closet this summer, fall came and I bought one too many sweaters. I decided to make the most of those purchases. Instead of reselling or donating the items, I made thrifted sweater stockings instead. They were pretty easy to make, were a great way to upcycle, and add a personal touch to my home. It’s a win-win-win.

    If you can cut and sew a straight line, you can make these thrifted sweater stockings.

    thrifted sweater stockings holiday DIYAll I used to make these were two thrifted sweaters, scissors, a sewing machine, and a half a yard of cotton for the lining. I decided that I wanted some lining in them, so that the sweater didn’t stretch too much when I placed items inside. Because these thrifted sweater stockings aren’t just for show. We will be using them this season, too.

    I actually had this idea last year, but never got around to making them. Life works in mysterious ways, and I think the universe wanted me to save this craft project for my new home.

    All in all, the thrifted sweater stockings are 100% cotton — lining and sweater. That part was really important to me. I’ve become way more aware of the fabrics that I am wearing this year. It was just as important to me that the materials that I am creating with are just as good for the planet.

    1. I made a pattern for the stocking using a large ream of sketch paper that I had on hand, but you could easily just trace another stocking of the size that you like.
    2. After that I pinned and cut two sides of the sweater. I pinned and cut both of them at the same time to save me some time. But you could easily do two different cuts, if you’re feeling a bit nervous.
    3. Next step was to cut the cotton lining and sew them to the inside of the sweater stocking.
    4. I then sewed the two pieces of lined stocking together. I made sure to leave one side open, so that I could sew on the top cuff.
    Pro tip: if you’re not confident with sewing on a different piece for the cuff, just make the tops of the stocking extra large and fold them down. You won’t get two different textures, but it will give the same effect!
    5. The last step is to sew the cuff on and attach a little tab by hand.

    thrifted sweater stockings DIY holidayAfter that you’re all done and ready to hang your thrifted sweater stockings. I decided to hang mine on some cute little hangers that looked sort of like deer antlers. We didn’t go all out with out Christmas decorations this year. Instead, we decided to stock with classic, all-white decor.

    For our first holiday season, it made more sense for us to incorporate some holiday touches, instead of just going all out red and green. We are still figuring out our style and the way we want our home.

    I am a bit biased, but I think they turned out really nice! This is the perfect craft to do with the family. Everyone can pick their favorite sweater and cut them out together. Heck, you could even make souvenirs out of your ugly Christmas sweaters every year.

    Not to mention that you’re saving an item from the landfill at the same time.

    Around the same time that I was DIYing these, Emily Faith made some of her own as well. If you’re looking for a full tutorial, make sure to head to her YouTube page. Hers are a little different than mine, but I think you will really enjoy looking at her page.

    What do you guys think of my stockings? I really want to start showing off more of my thrifted decor. I’m also making it a mission next year to create more — in every sense of the word. I feel like these thrifted sweater stockings were the perfect way to kick off the new season a little early. I’m a firm believer in starting New Year’s resolutions early, too. Nothing feels better than going into the new year already in the swing of things!

    xx.

     

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