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Thrifting

  • InThrifting

    3 Tips For Thrifting Capsule Wardrobe Pieces

    Every year I swap out my spring and summer wardrobe with my fall and winter items. I pull the box out from underneath my bed and go through all the sweaters from the year before. Without a doubt, my style always changes. While I don’t get rid of everything in my winter collection from year to year, I do find myself building brand new capsule collections for every season. That’s the fun part about a capsule wardrobe — you can mold and shape your style for the season while not having to feel overwhelmed with the options in your closet.

    Cleveland Goodwill thrifting capsule wardrobe collection

    What is a capsule wardrobe? It’s anywhere from 10 to 30 items that all work together to form different outfits. Think of it as your favorite, tried and true items that you want to wear every single day. And, yes, you can find those items at the thrift shop. In fact, with a few tips and tricks, you could find your entire capsule collection in one trip.

    The key to building a capsule collection is all about mindset.

    You have to get out of the mindset that you need to own something because it looks good. It might be the cutest shirt in the world, but is it practical? Does it work with other items in your closet? Can you see yourself wearing it someplace other than Instagram? Building a capsule wardrobe is about the feeling that you get when you’re in the clothing. You’ll feel like your truest self and you won’t want to take the item off once it’s on.

    There are plenty of brands that you can shop to build your own capsule wardrobe. Heck, VETTA CAPSULE creates an entire 30-outfit wardrobe for you with just five pieces. The only catch is that it will cost you about $500 to buy the entire wardrobe.

    When you shop at the thrift shop, you have to do a little more digging but save a whole lot of money. My own wardrobe is proof that it is possible. Yes, there will be some items that just don’t work. (I show you my hits and my misses over on Instagram.) If you’re up for the challenge, try these three tips to build your very own thrift capsule wardrobe.

    1. Know your personal style.

    If you’re thrifting for your perfect 10 to 30 piece wardrobe, you need to first know what your personal style is. The number of options at the thrift store can be overwhelming, even if you’re a pro. There is everything from vintage prints and patterns to classic staples and everything in-between. It’s all sitting there on the same rack — not divided into sections like it would be at a department store.

    Before you head into the thrift shop, get a clear picture in your mind of what kind of capsule collection that you’re looking for. Are you a minimalist? Do you want tons of colors that go together? Do you want mainly staple pieces with a few out-there looks? Anything goes when it comes to personal style, but it’s overwhelming to try and figure it out while you’re trying to build a capsule wardrobe. Baby steps, my friend.

    2. Grab a notebook and get planning.

    Nothing great in life comes without a little bit of planning, and thrifting is the same way. When you’re building a capsule wardrobe, it’s important to know what you want. The key is to do this on a piece of paper — not saved pictures on Pinterest or Instagram. By all means, print and paste and get creative with it. But sit down with a pen and paper and write down the items that are important for you to have. Of course, leave some room to get creative too.

    I am a firm believer that you can manifest anything in your life. I cannot tell you how many times I have written down, pictured, collaged items in my notebook and found them at the thrift shop the exact same week. The mind is a powerful tool.

    There’s also the added bonus that having a list in front of you at the thrift shop is a great tactic. When you get knee-deep into the sweater section, it’s nice to have a reminder to move on to t-shirts or skirts.

    Cleveland Goodwill thrifting capsule wardrobe collection

    3. Try on everything.

    Yes, I mean everything. Grab a cart at the beginning of the thrift trip, fill it with every single item that you think might work for you, and try the items on. Get over the fear of trying on secondhand items, because you will not know which items you should have in your closet until you try them on. It’s as simple as that.

    It’s one thing to see an item on a hanger or see it on someone’s Instagram. It’s a completely different thing to feel it on your body.

    You will know when an item should be a part of your capsule wardrobe by the feeling you get in the fitting room. You will quite literally get excited to wear the item. You’ll start pairing it with other items that you threw in your cart and imagining wearing the items to work or school or whatever life event you have. Trust me, the feeling is real and it is exciting.

    Thrifting an entire thrifted capsule collection is possible. It might not happen overnight, but if you know your style, plan, and aren’t afraid to try on a whole lot of items, you’ll be on the way to the closet of your dreams.

    Bonus tip: Wear items that you love to the thrift store.

    If you already have a few items that you know are going to be staples in your thrift capsule collection, wear them when you go shopping. It is so much easier to envision what items will work for you if they work with items that you already own.

    I recently set aside an afternoon and start building my winter capsule wardrobe collection for myself, and I used this tip when I went. The jeans and boots that I’m wearing in my photos are two of my favorite items in my closet. It was a heck of a lot easier to know which items were right for me when I could already see them styled. I got all the above items plus one more in one trip. And guess what? I had a photo of that wool jacket in my journal. I just so happened to find it in my size for $6. The black cashmere sweater, staple burgundy long sleeve tee, 100% cotton white sweater, and a thick, oversized gray cardigan is a third of my capsule wardrobe found all in one trip.

    If I can do it, so can you.

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    On Thrifting As Catharsis

    Picture it: you’re walking into your favorite store, hoping to find your go-to sweater. It’s a few months before it starts to get chilly, but you’re looking to get a head start on your warm-weather wardrobe. You walk in, grab a few items that stick out, and head to the fitting rooms. There you are, standing in front of the mirror. You turn around to look in the mirror after slipping on the sweater and BAM — it fits you perfectly. That is the feeling that this blog gives me.

    Tales from the Thrift Shop has been a place to share thrift tips, styling hacks, and new ways to think about secondhand fashion. But my love for thrifting has always been much more than that. It’s time that I faced the facts of why I started this blog head on — to figure out who I am.

    I haven’t always had a clear sense of self. Honestly, I didn’t even realize that I didn’t know who I was until after college. Everyone tells you that college is the time to explore yourself and “figure it all out.” For me, college was a time to try new things, navigate my comfort zone, and face new anxieties. It also happened to be the time that I realized that I didn’t know how to handle my anxiety.

    sunflower field thrifting as catharsis find my style

    It’s hard to figure out who you are when you’re afraid to leave the house, try new things, or put yourself out there to new people. I blended in. I stayed out of people’s way, was afraid to stick out, and went with the flow. Oh, and I definitely didn’t yell my love for thrifting from the rooftops as I do now.

    College is supposed to be a time that you figure yourself out.
    Instead, I figured out that I was too afraid to do that.

    My journey to figuring out who I was didn’t start until right here on this blog. The more I wrote about fashion for Bustle, the more interested I was in my own style. Style is about who you are as a person. It’s a way to show who you are without saying a thing. I didn’t know who that was, but I wanted to find out.

    The only thing that I knew was that I wasn’t a fan of mainstream fashion. Growing up, life was all about heading to the mall and shopping. I knew I wanted to stay far away from there. I also wasn’t making a whole lot of money, so I hit the thrift shop.

    I loved that I could shop whatever style I wanted. There was vintage, minimalist, over-the-top, and everything in between. The options felt freeing to me. I loved being the one to choose my outfit — not a mannequin or buyer stocking the store for that season. I could be anyone that I wanted to be.

    I got the chance to find myself, and it was the least anxious I had ever been.

    I was finally myself. I loved it. And now, whenever I’m feeling down or lost, IJ hit the thrift store to get that feeling back. I don’t have to think about anything but being myself. It’s my own little world that I can get lost in. Bonus points that I’m saving the planet and clothing from the landfill at the same time. I love that I can share that feeling with you on this blog. It’s my thrift shop away from the thrift shop. I hope you feel the exact same feeling when you’re reading these posts.

    Heck, if you’re feeling a little anxious, maybe the thrift shop will help you too. Because it’s nice to feel in control of your style when there are so many other things out of your control.

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    Here’s How I Found The Perfect Bachelorette Party Outfit At The Thrift Shop

    This blog is called Tales From the Thrift Shop, so I figured it was time to, well, share some of my personal shares from the thrift shop. This week was all about finding an outfit for an upcoming bachelorette party. When I say upcoming, I mean that it’s happening on Saturday. Last-minute, I know. I couldn’t find quite the right outfit for me, so I decided to keep looking at the thrift store instead of settling.

    On the first trip to the thrift store, I found pretty much nothing. It was still mid-August, so the thrift store was still stocked with tank tops and summer dresses. The bachelorette party was in September, so I wanted to make sure my look was fall-appropriate — just in case the weather did decide to drop for our night out. I left that trip empty. Well, I did snag myself some cute new cotton napkins for my kitchen, hehe.

    The next few trips happened in a blur. I’d run in when I had a free minute, look through the dress section, and then run out. I didn’t find anything on those trips, but I figured that a quick trip was better than nothing. At that point, my main goal was to figure out when the fall items would be stocked.

    Then, September hit. The first day of the month came, and it was like all the leaves had magically changed colors. The thrift store’s tank top section had magically turned to sweaters. It was the moment that I had finally been waiting for. The dress section got a re-vamp too. There was now heavier fabrics, dresses with sleeves, and darker colors popping up everywhere. While there still weren’t a ton of items that I deemed “going out worthy,” I found a few that I thought could be winners and hit the fitting room.

    The first dress I found had thing, black and white diagonal stripes. It had two layers of dress. One was a thin, sheer layer with the print, and the other was a black silk layer underneath. I liked it but didn’t love it.

    Dress number two was a little more promising. It was a lace spaghetti-strapped dress that screamed, “let’s party.” It fit me just right, and I planned to put a leather jacket over it and be ready for fall. I didn’t know what shoes I would wear with it, but I added it to my cart anyway and decided that it would have to do.

    The dress was perfect for a bachelorette party, but not perfect for me.

    When I looked at the dress, I could tell it was meant to be worn to a bachelorette party. That’s why I decided to put it in my cart. I also knew that there was a good chance that I would never wear the dress again; 1. Black just isn’t my color, 2. the lace isn’t the most practical, and 3. I was showing a little more skin than I typically opt for. It might have only been $6, but, personally, I don’t see a point in buying an outfit just to wear it once. That goes for special occasion outfits, sweaters, and everything between. I want to invest in pieces that feel like me. Pieces that I want to grab when I’m getting ready in the morning. Not just pieces that work for one night.

    Simply put, I will never buy an outfit just to wear it once. No ifs, ands, or buts about it.

    While I’m saying all of this, I also have to be honest about what was going through my head at the moment that I was shopping — “I’ll stick this in my cart, just in case I can’t find anything else.” Thankfully, I did.

    Honestly, I didn’t mean to find the outfit that I did. I was walking around, trying to kill time while my mom was still in the fitting room. The skirt section was right next to the fitting rooms, so I mosied over there. As I was sifting through, I saw a long black skirt. The material felt nice in my hands and the asymmetrical buttons had me sold from the moment I saw it. I grabbed it and put it in my cart. Then, as I was walking back to the fitting room, I noticed a top in my ideal shade of brown. It was off-the-shoulders, had tied sleeves, and was 100% cotton. SOLD.

    I got to the fitting room that my mom was at and decided to throw the two items on together, just to kill time. And wouldn’t you know, they ended up looking absolutely perfect together. The skirt had an unnoticed slit in the front that ended up making it the perfect going out look. That, mixed with the amount of shoulder that was showing from the off-the-shoulder top made it the perfect amount of skin showing. I was comfortable and knew that I’d wear the items again. I decided right then and there to ditch the lace dress and opt for the skirt-top combo.

    The top and the skirt rang in at $4 each.

    That’s $8 for an outfit that I will wear not only to the bachelorette party but all throughout the holiday season. I can see the skirt matching with sweaters over it, tank tops under it, and jackets over top of it. I already know that I’ll be wearing the top to Thanksgiving this year too. So, yes, it was a great $8 investment.

    This is what I mean when I say to make every purchase count. It might take some patience — trust me, it took me a while to learn too — but it’s almost always worth the wait. It’s like there are thrift gods out there looking out for you every time, as long as you wait for it. But, all jokes aside, it’s worth it to feel confident in what you’re buying.

    Oh, and you’ll likely see this on the ‘gram multiple times — no shame here. Major Kim K vibes, am I right?

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    4 Tips for an Easier Thrift Store Trip, So You Can Score Secondhand Items Without the Stress

    You’re scrolling through Instagram in bed, which you swore you’d stop doing. You’re desperately trying to get past your friend’s “take-me-back” vacation photos, and all of a sudden you see some outfit inspiration. It’s the most gorgeous white linen top and matching culottes. Right when you tap the tags to see where you can get that gorgeous-yet-slightly-vintage outfit, you see that it’s from the thrift store. You’re likely amazed since the best thing that you’ve ever found was that bulky sweater that screams “I’m secondhand!” and can’t seem to figure out how this whole thrifting thing really works. Well, this post is for you.

    Thrifting is not as easy as walking through a department store, finding the item you love, and choosing your own style. But the benefits of thrifting are better for the planet, your wallet, and the landfill. As someone that’s been in the thrift-game for years now, I’m here to take my knowledge and pass it on. Here, take the baton. I want to make your trip a little easier, so you can see just how much fun thrifting can be. There are four foolproof tips that will get any beginner — or someone that’s been thrifting for a while — an easier thrift store trip.

    First off, I applaud you just reading this. It means that you’re ready to make the switch to a more sustainable wardrobe, which means you deserve a big pat on the back. Now, with that out of the way, here are four tips to make your next thrift trip that much easier.

    1. Make a list.

    Going to the thrift shop with a list is one of the best things that you can do to make your thrift trip a little more organized. The thrift store has everything you can possibly imagine. There are hats and dresses and skirts and blazers and everything in between. If you have a list of items or outfit inspiration that you’re going off of, you’ll know exactly which color and item sections to hit when you walk in the door. Of course, you don’t have to stick to this list, but it will give you someplace to start. It will also help with the overwhelm of so many sections, not enough time.

    Personally, I have two ways of making a list. While a lot of people like Pinterest, I tend to get most of my outfit inspiration from Instagram. I have a saved collection titled “Outfit Inspo” on the ‘gram. I pull it up when I’m at the thrift shop to see which colors and items that I’ve been loving lately. That’s where I start.

    My other tactic is to have a running list on my phone of items that I can’t seem to get off of my brain. For example, I have been all about straw hats and bags lately. I kept thinking about the items over and over, so I added them to my phone list. I actually found both of them within the month, too. (You can see them both on my Instagram page.) The only rule for the list is that I have to think about the item three times before it’s added. That way I know that it will work well in my wardrobe and not sit in the corner of my closet.

    2. Bring cash.

    When the possibilities are endless and the prices are low, the thrift store can seem overwhelming. Sometimes the hardest part of thrifting is deciding what you will or won’t get. Especially if you have the privilege of being able to afford the prices. Next time you go to the thrift store, try taking a set amount of money with you next time you go instead. Yes, actual paper money. You’ll be forced to look at price tags and buy only the items that you’ll actually use or wear.

    3. Get a cart.

    Just do it, okay? Even if you think you’re only there to get one thing. Just grab a cart when you go through the door. When both hands are free, you’re more likely to check price tags and labels. You’ll make more strategic purchases and be able to see all of your item laid out in front of you. That way it’s a win-win for everyone involved — you, the planet, and your wallet.

    Seeing everything in front of you will make it clear that you have four skirts and maybe don’t need all of them. Or that you found three mugs and should possibly put a few back on the shelf. I can’t tell you how many times that I’ve seen friends head to the checkout and forget that they held that item that they only-sort-of-liked. They end up putting it on the counter with everything else and creating more clutter in their life. Grabbing a cart is an easy way to skip that and buy the items that you truly want in your life.

    4. Don’t scan every aisle.

    The sections at the thrift store are pretty much endless. There’s everything from sweaters and hats to homeware and books. Heck, some stores even keep winter jackets out year-round for the people looking to shop early. It can easily feel overwhelming. Just know that you don’t have to scan every single aisle. Maybe you’re only looking for the perfect pair of shorts one day. Maybe the next you only want to see if there’s a good deal on picture frames. Don’t think you have to do it all.

    It can be hard to feel like you might miss out on the perfect item at the thrift store. Especially since items are all one-of-a-kind and not guaranteed to be there next time around. But that doesn’t mean that you should spend hours in the thrift store. Stick to the aisles that interest you and your wallet will thank you.

    Remember that you will find the items that you are meant to. You don’t need to buy everything from home goods to accessories all in the same trip. Thrift shopping is all about the hunt, but you should only be hunting the items that you truly need in your life. You get to decide what that is, and I hope that these tips make your job secondhand shopping a little bit easier.

    xx.

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  • InLifestyle, Thrifting

    How To Fix The Brim Of A Thrifted Straw Hat & Get The Instagram Look For Less

    Ah, straw. Whether it’s made into bags or worn as hats, straw is one summer trend that isn’t going away any time soon. Thankfully, all great trends come back again, which means that you can skip the fast fashion and hit the thrift store to find yourself the trend. But when you do, it will likely not be in pristine condition. Secondhand shopping means sometimes looking at items with a little imagination. Maybe there’s a little snag in the brim of the hat or an ugly accessory wrapped around the top. There are plenty of ways to fix the brim of a thrifted straw hat with items that you already have at home. You’ll just need a little bit of time and patience to get the look that you saw on Instagram.

    My straw hat came to me by surprise. I wasn’t necessarily looking for one when I entered the thrift shop that day, but I’ve been eyeing up anything straw when I pass it by lately. I tossed it into my cart, grabbed a few other items, and went over to the fitting rooms. As soon as I put on the hat, I knew it was meant to be. There was pretty much a big golden halo and the *AHH* church sound effects going off in the background. Then I turned around and the person behind me was clearly not seeing what I saw when I looked in the mirror.

    I couldn’t blame her, to be honest. While the hat did fit on my head well, it had glue marks from something that had been ripped off of the band. It was also curled up around the outside. Your average thrifter might have tossed this to the side and tried again. But I could see the potential of the straw hat from the moment that I put it on my head. It was a no-brainer for me — especially since the price tag read $1.99 and it was half off day. SCORE.

    The next step was to take my new straw hat home and get it looking as good in real life as it did in my head. My first concern was to sanitize it. While I generally don’t mind buying hats a thrift store, I still take them home and make sure they’re as sanitized as possible before I wear them. Thankfully, this was easy, since it was a straw hat. The next concern was cleaning the glue off the band and seeing if I could get the edges of the hat to sit flat, instead of curling upward. Here’s a simple, step-by-step of everything I did to fix my thrifted straw hat.

    Clean the straw hat.

    Before I did anything, I sprayed my newly thrifted straw hat with Castile soap. I am a big fan of using this spray mixture on thrifted items. My personal recipe is very non-technical. I squirt a few squirts of Castile soap into a spray bottle and fill the rest with water. After spraying the hat and letting it sit for about ten minutes, I wipe it off with a rag. Then I spray it down again with some white vinegar, wipe it off, and it’s good to go.

    The Castile soap mixture also worked to get the glue off of the band of my hat. This was a nice little surprise to me and made my job that much easier. The Castile soap isn’t just antibacterial, but it helps visually clean off anything from the hat too.

    Iron the brim.

    I really hope that you didn’t just read the heading and not dive into this part because it’s not exactly that easy. You can’t just put the iron on the brim. That might burn the hat or make it stick to the iron. Since I didn’t want to ruin my straw hat, I was really careful.

    I turned my iron on the medium setting, set a towel over the top of my straw hat brim, and ironed it that way. Honestly, I probably could have put it on the high setting, but I didn’t want to ruin it. The straw hat went from curled brim to flat as a pancake in just minutes. It stayed that way since, too.

    It’s truly that easy, my friends. When it comes to thrifting, sometimes a little imagination and a quick DIY go a long way.

    xx.

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  • InSustainable Fashion, Thrifting

    3 Natural Fabrics That I Always Look For At The Thrift Shop

    I have been thrifting pretty regularly for about two years now. I’ve gone through many phases during that time. There was the throw-it-all-in-the-cart phase, where I would toss in every single thing that I *might* like. There was also the spend-half-an-hour-in-the-fitting-room phase, which was the most annoying to other shoppers. Oh, and who could forget the homewares-only phase, which left me with 72 mugs and no place to put them. Now, I am on the buy-only-what-I-really-need phase, which is my personal favorite of all of them. I’ve gotten a clear focus on what my personal style is and now I’m on to the search for all natural fabrics — linen, cotton, and silk.

    Why natural fabrics, you ask? Well, to put it simply, synthetic fabrics are harmful to you and bad for the planet. That’s the short explanation. But to dig deeper, you need to know a little more about synthetic vs. natural fabrics. Natural fibers are created by animal, vegetable, or mineral sources. Synthetic fibers are man-made textiles that are made entirely of chemicals. You can probably guess from reading their definitions why one might be deemed “better” than the other.

    Of course, no fabric is completely perfect. There are ups and downs to just about everything in the fashion world, and ultimately what you wear and buy is a personal decision. Fashion, in general, is personal. What you choose to wear on your body may differ from someone else. Personally, I like to stick with natural fabrics for a few reasons; 1) They feel better on my body and 2) They create no chemical or microfibre runoff when in the laundry.

    I’ve thrifted so much that I can pretty much tell what an item is made out of when I touch it. I love to walk through the aisles and push the hangers from one side to another to feel the fabrics. While I don’t go through every single item in the store, I can easily push through the colors — mainly grays, whites, olive greens, and anything striped — and styles that I like. But I didn’t start out with having the sixth sense for fabrics. I started searching for natural fabrics by reading the labels.

    Reading labels is the number one way to learn about fabrics.

    I know, I know. Reading labels takes time. But if you’re committed to knowing what’s on your body, it’s worth it to take the time to read. Think about it this way: you wouldn’t buy a new product in the grocery store without checking the ingredients, right? The same goes for your clothing. Your skin is your biggest organ, and what you put on it matters. Your skin will absorb what sits on it. If that is chemicals, dyes, and pesticides, then that’s what you’re absorbing. That’s true no matter how many times you wash it.

    Of course, even natural fabrics have their downfalls. Like I mentioned before, fashion is personal and so is the decision of what you buy. Personally, I will always stick with natural fabrics. Here’s the low-down on my top three favorite fabrics to shop at the thrift shop, so you can make your mind up about what to buy too.

    Linen.

    natural fabrics at the thrift shop

    Before we get all technical about what linen is, let me gush about my love of the fabrics for a little bit. Now that summer’s here, I am all about that linen life. First of all, it’s breathable. I absolutely hate sweating, and there’s nothing worse than wearing a fabric that makes you even hotter in the summertime. This lightweight fabric keeps you cool at all times.

    Secondly, I really love that it wrinkles. I love fabrics that look lived in, because, let’s be honest, that’s what clothing is for. I don’t want to walk around in a fresh-pressed, stuffy outfit all day. Instead, I want people to know that I love and live in the clothing that I wear. It’s the ultimate sign of comfort.

    Now let’s get into the technical reasons to love linen. The fabric is made from flax plants, and every single part of the plant is used. It’s extremely versatile, is stronger when wet, and doesn’t absorb bacteria. Pretty much the only downside to linen, besides that it wrinkles, is that it’s pricey. This is because linen takes longer to manually produce than other fabrics. Thankfully, it’s super affordable at the thrift shop.

    Cotton.

    Nothing beats the feel of cotton. Well, except maybe organic cotton. This fabric is a staple for a reason. It wears well, is comfortable, and last a super long time. On top of being light and breathable, it’s also completely natural.

    Cotton, as you might know, is a plant. It’s completely natural, but there are plenty of downsides. Cotton is extremely water intensive. It can take up to 700 gallons of water to make a single t-shirt. The plant is also often genetically modified, which can be harmful to the plant and the farmers growing it. This is why it’s great to shop for cotton at the thrift store, instead of buying new. Let’s make the most out of the cotton that’s already out there before buying new.

    Silk.

    Ah, silk. Is there anything more satisfying than slipping on this smooth, delicate fabric? Rhetorical question. It’s expensive feel, and, well, expensive too. Unless, of course, you get it from the thrift shop. Silk is a fabric that’s been around forever. Seriously, it was first observed in 27th century BCE, when a silkworm cocoon fell into her cup of tea and began to unravel. Come on, that’s incredible.

    One of the biggest and most obvious downsides to silk is that it’s made by silkworms. That means that it’s not vegan. Unfortunately, the silkworms die once they are done making the fabric. They are also domesticated to create silk until then. At the end of the day, it’s a personal decision to buy or not buy silk.

    There are — and will always be — ups and downs to all fabrics. But, by far, the most ethical choice of them all is to shop secondhand. Using what is already made is always the best way to go. You know, besides not buying anything at all. The more you thrift, the more you will find what fabrics are your favorites. It takes time and awareness to figure out what fits your lifestyle. Do your research, read your labels, and get excited about learning about new fabrics.

    xx.

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