InLifestyle, Thrifting

How To Fix The Brim Of A Thrifted Straw Hat & Get The Instagram Look For Less

how to fix a thrifted straw hat

Ah, straw. Whether it’s made into bags or worn as hats, straw is one summer trend that isn’t going away any time soon. Thankfully, all great trends come back again, which means that you can skip the fast fashion and hit the thrift store to find yourself the trend. But when you do, it will likely not be in pristine condition. Secondhand shopping means sometimes looking at items with a little imagination. Maybe there’s a little snag in the brim of the hat or an ugly accessory wrapped around the top. There are plenty of ways to fix the brim of a thrifted straw hat with items that you already have at home. You’ll just need a little bit of time and patience to get the look that you saw on Instagram.

My straw hat came to me by surprise. I wasn’t necessarily looking for one when I entered the thrift shop that day, but I’ve been eyeing up anything straw when I pass it by lately. I tossed it into my cart, grabbed a few other items, and went over to the fitting rooms. As soon as I put on the hat, I knew it was meant to be. There was pretty much a big golden halo and the *AHH* church sound effects going off in the background. Then I turned around and the person behind me was clearly not seeing what I saw when I looked in the mirror.

I couldn’t blame her, to be honest. While the hat did fit on my head well, it had glue marks from something that had been ripped off of the band. It was also curled up around the outside. Your average thrifter might have tossed this to the side and tried again. But I could see the potential of the straw hat from the moment that I put it on my head. It was a no-brainer for me — especially since the price tag read $1.99 and it was half off day. SCORE.

The next step was to take my new straw hat home and get it looking as good in real life as it did in my head. My first concern was to sanitize it. While I generally don’t mind buying hats a thrift store, I still take them home and make sure they’re as sanitized as possible before I wear them. Thankfully, this was easy, since it was a straw hat. The next concern was cleaning the glue off the band and seeing if I could get the edges of the hat to sit flat, instead of curling upward. Here’s a simple, step-by-step of everything I did to fix my thrifted straw hat.

Clean the straw hat.

Before I did anything, I sprayed my newly thrifted straw hat with Castile soap. I am a big fan of using this spray mixture on thrifted items. My personal recipe is very non-technical. I squirt a few squirts of Castile soap into a spray bottle and fill the rest with water. After spraying the hat and letting it sit for about ten minutes, I wipe it off with a rag. Then I spray it down again with some white vinegar, wipe it off, and it’s good to go.

The Castile soap mixture also worked to get the glue off of the band of my hat. This was a nice little surprise to me and made my job that much easier. The Castile soap isn’t just antibacterial, but it helps visually clean off anything from the hat too.

Iron the brim.

I really hope that you didn’t just read the heading and not dive into this part because it’s not exactly that easy. You can’t just put the iron on the brim. That might burn the hat or make it stick to the iron. Since I didn’t want to ruin my straw hat, I was really careful.

I turned my iron on the medium setting, set a towel over the top of my straw hat brim, and ironed it that way. Honestly, I probably could have put it on the high setting, but I didn’t want to ruin it. The straw hat went from curled brim to flat as a pancake in just minutes. It stayed that way since, too.

It’s truly that easy, my friends. When it comes to thrifting, sometimes a little imagination and a quick DIY go a long way.

xx.

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